COVID-19 is a public health emergency. Albertans are legally required under public health order to self isolate for:

  • 14 days if you recently returned from international travel or are a close contact of someone with COVID-19
  • 10 days if they you have a COVID-19 symptom (cough, fever, shortness of breath, runny nose, or sore throat) that is not related to a pre-existing illness or health condition

COVID-19 Cases in Alberta

The provincial government is taking aggressive measures to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Click Here for information on confirmed cases and laboratory testing in Alberta.

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Alberta Connects Contact Centre

The Alberta Connects Contact Centre is now open seven days a week, from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm. Call 310.4455 toll-free for general information about the provincial response to COVID-19.

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Online Self-assessment

Use this self-assessment tool to help determine whether you need to be tested for COVID-19. You can complete this assessment for yourself or on behalf of someone else if they're not able.

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COVID-19: Stay Current on Most Recent Developments

Scroll down to find critical information, answers to common questions, and links to different resources.
Daily updates from Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Chief Medical Officer of Alberta

Mandatory Province-wide Restrictions

Mandatory, province-wide restrictions are in effect to protect the health system and slow the spread of COVID-19.
Bend the curve

Due to Alberta’s continued high case numbers, aggressive action is still required to protect our health system from being overwhelmed. We need to be careful not to remove restrictions too quickly.

Restriction changes to outdoor gatherings, funerals and personal and wellness services came into effect January 18, 2021.

All other mandatory restrictions remain in place until further notice. Provincial and regional health trends will continue to be monitored and assessed over the coming weeks to determine if further easing of restrictions may be considered.

Health officials are monitoring the situation and will adjust measures if required.

New public health measures at a glance
Read more about the provincial mandatory measures in effect
Subscribe to regional COVID-19 status notifications

Get the Facts About COVID-19 Vaccines

With the arrival of the COVID-19 vaccine in Alberta, we have the opportunity to slow the spread of the virus. We all must do our part to protect one another. Immunization is the single most effective means of protecting yourself, your loved ones and the greater community from COVID-19.

Eligibility to receive the COVID-19 vaccine

When will the COVID-19 vaccine be available to the general public?

Fall 2021 (Phase 3) is the current estimate.

Can I join a waitlist to be prioritized?

No, Alberta does not have a waitlist. The province recognizes that many people are anxious to be immunized for COVID-19, including those who are considered higher-risk or have other underlying health conditions. Continue to follow all public health guidelines to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

Please do not call Health Link about eligibility. Up-to-date information about the COVID-19 vaccine will be shared as it becomes available.

Will the COVID-19 vaccines be available for children?

Vaccines in Phases 1 and 2 will only be authorized for people 16 years and older (Pfizer- BioNTech) or 18 years of age and older (Moderna) and will require two doses per person for optimal immunity to COVID-19.

Alberta's Relaunch Strategy Puts Safety First

Alberta’s relaunch strategy puts safety first while gradually reopening businesses, resuming activities and getting people back to work. By working together, we can ensure our sacrifices to slow the spread of COVID-19 are not wasted.
A safely staged COVID-19 recovery plan to relaunch Alberta’s economy

To be successful, we must stay vigilant to slow the spread: follow public health measures, practice physical distancing and good hygiene, and continue acting responsibly. The plan to move forward requires careful monitoring and respecting all guidelines outlined by the Chief Medical Officer. Each stage of relaunch will depend on our ability to keep infection numbers low.

Conditions for relaunch
To ensure a safer reopening, the following elements are in place:

  • Enhance our nation-leading testing capacity at the highest level in Canada
  • Robust and comprehensive contact tracing, aided by technology, to quickly notify people who may have been exposed
  • Support for people who test positive to enable effective isolation and contain spread
  • Stronger international border controls and airport screening, especially for international travellers
  • Rules and guidance for the use of masks in crowded spaces, like mass transit
  • Strong protections for the most at-risk, including those in long-term care, continuing care and seniors lodges
  • A rapid response plan in the event of possible outbreaks of COVID-19

Learn about the conditions for relaunch and stages
Opening soon: Alberta's relaunch strategy (updated June 2020)

What Does Physical (Social) Distancing Mean?

Physical distancing is proven to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the spread of illness during an outbreak. Keep at least 6-feet away (about the length of a hockey stick) from others while in public.
Do your part to help prevent the spread of COVID-19

What does physical distancing mean?

Together, we can slow the spread of COVID-19 by making a conscious effort to keep a physical (social) distance between each other. Physical distancing is proven to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the spread of illness during an outbreak. This means making changes in your everyday routines in order to minimize close contact with others, including:

  • Avoiding crowded places and gatherings
  • Avoiding common greetings, such as handshakes
  • Limiting contact with people at higher risk (older adults and those in poor health)
  • Keeping a distance of at least 2 arms lengths (approximately 2 metres) from others, as much as possible
  • Follow Alberta’s restrictions on mass gatherings

Other steps you can take:

  • Wear a mask in public when distancing is not possible
  • Download and use the ABTraceTogether mobile contact tracing app while out in public
  • Wash hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol)
  • Use gloves properly if you choose to wear them (they are not necessary)
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or your elbow
  • Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands
  • Watch for COVID-19 symptoms
  • Take the COVID-19 self-assessment to arrange testing if you have any symptoms

Learn more about physical distancing

Non-medical Masks and Face Coverings

Masks are mandatory in all indoor public spaces and workplaces across Alberta. Find out how to choose and wear a non-medical mask to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Masks should complement – not replace – other prevention measures.
Non-medical masks and face coverings: About

COVID-19: Mandatory mask requirements

Effective December 8, 2020, masks are mandatory across Alberta in all:

  • Indoor public places
  • Places of worship
  • Indoor workplaces, except when working alone in an office or a safely distanced cubicle or a barrier is in place
  • Farm operations (exempt)

This workplace requirement:

  • Applies to all employees, customers, visitors, delivery personnel and contractors
  • Includes all workplace locations where masks won’t pose a safety risk
  • Does not change current student mask requirements in schools

Read about the Mandatory, province-wide restrictions in effect

Why use a mask

Wearing a homemade or non-medical mask in public is another tool to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. It hasn’t been proven that masks protect the person wearing it, but it can help protect people from being exposed to your germs. Masks should complement, not replace, other prevention measures. Continue physical distancing and good hand hygiene, and stay home when sick.

Face shields

Face shields do not replace masks or face coverings. A face shield is used to protect the eyes of the person wearing it.

Using a face shield without a mask won’t protect you from potentially inhaling infectious respiratory droplets exhaled by others, nor will it protect others from your infectious respiratory droplets, as they can escape around the face shield.

If you’re unable to wear a mask or face covering, you may want to wear a face shield. Choose one that extends around the sides of the face and below the chin. You’ll still need to maintain physical distancing of 2 metres, and practice good hand hygiene, especially if you touch the face shield.

Neck gaiters (neck warmers)

Neck gaiters (also known as neck warmers) are not recommended because they aren’t well secured to the head or ears, are likely to move or slip out of place, and are difficult to remove without contaminating yourself.

If a neck gaiter must be used as a face covering, it should be folded to provide at least 3 layers of fabric and should include a filter or filter fabric added between layers. Lift it away from your face, especially when taking it off, and wash your hands or use alcohol based hand sanitizer anytime you need to adjust it, especially when putting it on and taking it off.

Masks with exhalation valves

Masks with exhalation valves or vents are not recommended. These masks do not protect others from COVID-19 or limit the spread of the virus. This is because they allow infectious respiratory droplets to spread outside the mask.

Medical masks

Medical masks include N95 masks and surgical or procedure masks. N95 masks protect from exposure to biological aerosols that may contain viruses or bacteria. They are generally only required during specific, high-risk medical procedures. Surgical or procedure masks provide a barrier to splashes, droplets, saliva or spit. They are not designed to fit tightly against the face.

These masks should be kept for healthcare workers and others providing direct care to COVID-19 patients. They may also be recommended for use in some workplaces, like salons, where there is prolonged close contact with people.

Gloves

It is not necessary to wear gloves in public. If you choose to wear gloves, remember to wash your hands before you put them on and immediately after taking them off. Change the gloves if you touch your face, cover a cough or sneeze with your hands, or if they become dirty or torn. Always discard the gloves in a lined garbage bin after taking them off.

To avoid spreading germs or COVID-19, do not touch your face or mask with your gloves, do not touch any personal items (cell phone, bag, credit card) that you might touch again with bare hands, and do not try to wash gloves or use hand sanitizer with gloves on.

Online Self-assessment

Use this self-assessment tool to help determine whether you need to be tested for COVID-19. You can complete this assessment for yourself or on behalf of someone else if they're not able.

Resource Hub: Mental Health and Wellness During COVID-19

Given the ever-changing events around the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all experiencing varying degrees of a normal reaction to an abnormal event.
Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is a very stressful situation for individuals, businesses and communities. It’s normal to feel stress and anxiety. It’s also common for people to display great resiliency during times of crisis. We should remember that this is absolutely the time to lean on each other. Even if we can’t be close physically, we need to stay close emotionally. So, while you’re staying in, stay in touch with each other, and reach out if you need support.

Alberta Health Services has resources and services available to help you or someone you know. Remember, if you’re struggling you’re not alone. There are supports to help you.

Important Phone Numbers

COVID-19 Financial Relief for Albertans

The provincial and federal governments are taking immediate and significant action to help Albertans facing financial hardship as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.
Service Canada is ready to help

Service Canada provides Canadians with a single point of access to a wide range of government services and benefits. They are committed to improving services for Canadians by working with partners to provide access to the full range of government services and benefits that Canadians want and need through the Internet, by telephone, in person or by mail.

Resources for Businesses Affected by COVID-19

In the face of an uncertain economic situation and tightening credit conditions, the government is taking action to help affected businesses.
Business continuity plans: flu and infectious disease outbreaks

Employers should consider their Business Continuity Plan and how COVID-19 could impact their workplace. To prepare, make plans to protect employees, limit spread in workplaces, ensure continuity of critical services if staff are ill or self-isolating, and explore alternate working arrangements, such as working from home or remotely and/or doing work that doesn't require contact with other people.

Learn more about Business Continuity Plans

COVID-19 Financial Relief Programs for Businesses

The provincial and federal governments are providing immediate funding and supportive measures to help protect local businesses, employers and employees.

COVID-19 Financial Support Measures for Various Sectors

The government is taking a tailored approach to better protecting individual sectors from the economic distribution of COVID-19.

Canadian Manufacturers Needed to Help Combat COVID-19

Are you a Canadian manufacturer or business that can supply products and services in support of Canada’s response to COVID-19? If so, we want to hear from you.
In combating COVID-19, we’re stronger together

If you are a Canadian manufacturer or business that can assist Canada in meeting the need for medical supplies, your help is needed. Please refer to the product specifications and requirements for Canada’s medical supply needs. If you can say yes to the following, we really want to hear from you.

  • You manufacture in Canada and/or have ready access to necessary inputs through your supply chain
  • You have equipment or facilities that can be rapidly re-tooled to meet medical needs, including for personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves, masks and surgical gowns, sanitizers, wipes, ventilators, and/or other medical equipment and supplies
  • You have skilled workers who are able to respond and who could be available for work in the current circumstances
  • The Plan to Mobilize Industry to fight COVID-19 directly supports businesses to rapidly scale up production or re-tool their manufacturing lines to develop products made in Canada that will help in the fight against COVID-19

Explore product specifications and requirements for Canada’s medical supply needs
My business wants to help